Gucci cruise: ironic logos, rainbow colours and ‘Guccification’

gucci cruise show 2018 florence italy


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Gucci cruise: ironic logos, rainbow colours and ‘Guccification'” was written by Hannah Marriott, for theguardian.com on Tuesday 30th May 2017 11.24 UTC

Matching your trousers to the carpet is the new ‘I’m with the band’

Jared Leto would like you to know that he is the planet’s biggest Gucci cheerleader. Previous displays of his devotion include the moment, at Gucci’s spring/summer 2017 menswear show that the sight of a kermit-coloured military coat on the runway inspired such untrammelled delight that Leto’s face became a Meme.

Jared Leto at the Gucci cruise show.

This time, Leto has upped his game by matching his marigold yellow trousers to the venue’s marigold yellow carpet. This demonstrates that Leto is not just another celebrity seat-filler; he is matey enough with Gucci wunderkind Alessandro Michele to get inside info on how his clothes will play with the furnishings. A bold superfan move.

You need to have an opinion on the meaning of ‘Guccy’

A model at the Gucci cruise 2018 show in Florence, Italy.
Guccify yourself! A model at the Gucci cruise 2018 show in Florence, Italy. Photograph: Venturelli/Getty Images

The new Gucci knows what it is doing with logo T-shirts. Its red and green striped T-shirt with gold branding has sold out pretty much everywhere, despite costing £370. Now, like so many other brands, Gucci is taking its logos in a knowing, ironic direction, riffing on its branding with the new logos unveiled in this cruise show: Guccy, Guccification, and Guccify Yourself.

The new logo: a Guccification bag.
The new logo: a Gucci bag carries the message. Photograph: Pietro D’aprano/Getty Images

Instantaneously the chin-stroking began, in fashion circles, on the meaning of these new logos: was it a reference to James Franco’s Funny or Die sketch, in which the actor cannot pronounce the name of the brand? A take on Crucify, a song Tori Amos played at the brand’s February after-party? Actually, “Guccification” is a term that has been used for decades, often as a bit of a diss, meaning too much bling, or too much Gucci. (Here it is attributed to Yves Saint Laurent as an expression of disappointment with his ready-to-wear line). Clearly, Michele is reclaiming it.

The cruise show venue-off continues

The big luxury brands are currently engaged in a game of around-the-world oneupmanship, holding cruise shows in ever more staggering locations. Gucci has already done Westminster Abbey (the Reverend Peter Owen-Jones memorably compared the arrangement to “selling our soul for a pair of trousers”). This time, Michele originally wanted to stage this show in the Parthenon in Athens, because, he said: “At the beginning, everything started in the Mediterranean, the Greek and Roman cultures. But we couldn’t have Athens, so I went to the next big step in civilisation, the Renaissance.”

A little bit of everything – capped off with a headdress covered in pearls.
A little bit of everything – capped off with a headdress covered in pearls. Photograph: Venturelli/Getty Images

The venue, then, was Palazzo Pitti’s sumptuous Palatine gallery, where models walked past sumptuous frescoes and paintings. A poem was embroidered into guests’ rainbow-coloured stools, written by Lorenzo de’ Medici in the 15th century. It read: “How beautiful our Youth is/ That’s always flying by us/ Who’d be happy let him be so:/ Nothing’s sure about tomorrow.” True and arty.

Dressing-up box meets Gucci bumbag pound

Here are the key visual takeaways that could soon influence your look. For starters, baseball caps are huge. Michele wore a teal-coloured Yankees cap to take his bow; the show invitations were Gucci-logoed linen caps embroidered with butterflies and each invitee’s name. There was also a preponderance of Game of Thrones-style long dresses; a riot of highly saturated colour; Dapper Dan-style logoed oversized sleeves; Mr Motivator-esque bumbags and sleek moneybelts, turbans, military coats, bomber jackets, metallics … Everything, basically, including an entire head decorated with pearls, the look we are keenest to see Leto try next.

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